Friday, March 02, 2012

My statement on the "Book of Mormon" Twitter List Debacle


I'm glad I still have this blog, because I can just tweet a link to various entries here, and (1) have my say in more than 140 characters, and (2) not subject my followers to multiple tweets complaining about being made to feel so crappy.

Here's my take:

--I'm a superfan of Broadway's "Book of Mormon."  I kept up with their development on FB, followed them on Twitter EARLY, and saw the show in July of 2011.  I took pictures (of other people getting their pictures with the stars, I was too shy), and then realized that MANY of the ensemble cast were also on Twitter, yet only the "big 4" (Andrew Rannells, Josh Gad, Nikki M. James, and Rory O'Malley) were publicized.

So I created a Twitter list.  Scott Barnhardt first hipped me to some ensemble members accounts, and I went from there.  I added in Bobby Lopez as well, and then even added in some crew/behind the scenes folks.  Some were huge, like Stephen Oremus, who won a Tony and Grammy for his orchestral work.

--But I also added in the 3 stage managers (highlighted by Josh Gad) who work so hard.

--Finally, I added on the Book of Mormon Company Manager, Adam Miller.

--The list was substantial (28 members!) and was both the most-followed Book of Mormon Twitter list out there (there were many), and was the most populated (28 was nearly double the next highest BoM Twitter list).

--Many of the cast members didn't have a ton of followers.  I usually welcomed them when they'd join Twitter (like Kevin D., or even Stephen), and noted that they were now listed on the comprehensive Twitter list, and hopefully, as people consulted it as a reference/clearinghouse, their following would increase.  Groovy, good vibes, yada-yada.

--Things seemed fine.  NONE of the crew rejected my following of them on Twitter.  In fact, NONE of those listed/followed: 

1.  Stopped me from following them.
2.  Stopped me from listing them, or
3.  Asked me to not endorse them on #FF days (I did list them on some #FF days).

Instead, in late February of 2012, I noticed that Adam Miller, the Book of Mormon Company Manager hadn't just @replied to me and asked me to de-list (or even de-follow).  He flat out blocked me.  Twitter confirmed this when I attempted to re-follow (not permanently, I only attempted to re-follow because THEN Twitter will tell you something like, "Sorry, this user has blocked you.").

Suffice it to say, I was hurt, and a little depressed/angry.  You can't even do me the courtesy of a reply/request to say, "Hey, I don't want to be on this list?"  At least let me ignore you before you go to the trouble to block me.

So, I just decided, "Hasa Diga."  I deleted the entire Twitter list.  I unfollowed every single BoM-related person.  Because Miller had blocked me, he couldn't see my comments, so I @replied to Rachel, a stage manager, and told her I was done.

The upshot of all this is that it brought back EVERY feeling from High School about being a misfit/outcast.  Once a freak, always a freak, apparently.  Things don't change.

That last part is tough to admit for someone who supports the teaching of Evolution, lol.  I got some personal phone calls from RL friends on Twitter, and even some @mentions about the list's deletion, and just took solace in the notion that I was never IN the cool crowd to begin with, so it shouldn't be a surprise that I'd be treated as a freak even when older.

But this whole thing hurt.  It was really surprising to me, because ordinarily, the staff of BoM are pretty friendly.  I'd actually had some good conversations with the BoM Twitter account via DMs, because I had been scouring YouTube, and alerting the Show Account to various bootleg videos that were online.  Together, we got the YT accounts deleted outright.  As of this writing, there are no bootleg videos on YT anymore, but I'll be damned if I'm going to alert anyone if I find any more.  I'd hate to be thought of as over-the-top.  Or blocked without comment/warning.  The musical itself is wonderful, as are the people.  It's a great, funny, and profound show.  But this is an example of the old adage, "Never meet your heroes."  While it isn't quite applicable to this situation, it's close.  Close enough that it really hurt.

So I'm done.